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Minimize Risk Without Sacrificing Returns? Sven Tells You How


  • By dissecting the S&P 500 per valuation quintiles we see that only parts of the market are overvalued.
  • Historically, buying the lowest PE quintile stocks has increased annual returns by 360 basis points.
  • High PE stocks have large market capitalizations which force you to own more of them through index funds, increasing your risks and lowering your returns.

Introduction 

Beyond the top news stories about central banks increasing stimulus to fight the BREXIT or sluggish economic data with high hopes for the future, there is one recurrent theme that still flies under the radar. The recurring theme is that financial markets are overvalued.

As we all know, bull markets climb a wall of worry. Investors who sold everything in 2011 believing markets were overvalued were happy for a while, but are probably still crying now as, if they had not gotten back in the market, they missed a huge upside. We might be in a similar situation where selling now would mean losing much upside, but there is another option.

Figure 1 S&P 500 last 10 years
Figure 1: S&P 500 chart for the last 10 years. Source: 5yearcharts.com.

Today we are going to discuss the alleged market overvaluation and dissect it into overvalued and undervalued segments. This is possible as the market is currently all over the place. We are going to end with an example of potential irrational exuberance, social network stocks, and show how such investments can be avoided even when allowing for a high level of diversification.

Dissecting Market Overvaluation

The PE ratio of the S&P 500 is 25.24 if you calculate it by using S&P 500 earnings. By changing methodology, you can get to other averages, but we believe this one to be the most accurate as it looks at aggregate earnings and not stock PE ratios with a lot of negative inputs that skew the result. The average PE ratio for all S&P 500 stocks with negative ratios included ends up at around 19, so don’t get confused by the difference.

In any case, the expected returns with a PE ratio of 25.24 are below 4% per annum, and as corporate earnings are not growing we cannot expect much more. If you hold a diversified ETF or mutual fund that tracks the market, you can’t expect more than 4% returns in the long run, but you should be able to lower your risks and even increase your long term returns if you choose not to include irrationally overvalued companies in your portfolio.

Of course, complete S&P 500 diversification is then out of the question, but here is why. When buying an index, the most expensive stocks have the largest weights because as they get more and more expensive, their market capitalization increases and the fund manager is forced to buy more, which further increases the price and forces the asset manager to buy even more creating a vicious circle that leads into irrational exuberance.

But by looking at quartile valuations of expected forward PE ratios, we see that the market is overvalued only within the highest PE quintile.

figure 2 quintile expected forward PE
Figure 2: S&P 500 PE ratios by quintile. Source: Smead Capital Management.

As historically stocks with the lowest PE ratios have outperformed all other groups, we can limit the risks of a market downturn by shifting our portfolios towards low PE ratio stocks. Those who did that in the last 40 years achieved above market returns of 360 basis points (market average 11.7%, lowest quintile PE stocks 15.3%).

figure 2 PE ratio returns
Figure 3: Returns by valuation quintile. Source: Smead Capital Management.

To give some research aid, here are the 25 S&P 500 stocks with the lowest PE ratios. Be careful because low PE ratios don’t always mean high earnings. Special events like divestitures or future imminent costs can skew PE ratios.

CompanyTickerPE Ratio
Delta Air Lines Inc.DAL3.87
Noble Corp.NE6.44
Yahoo! Inc.YHOO6.64
Valero Energy Corp.VLO7.03
American International Group Inc.AIG8.91
AFLAC Inc.AFL9.26
Assurant Inc.AIZ9.42
Danbury Resources, Inc.DNR9.50
Unumprovident Corp.UNM9.59
Deere & Co.DE9.69
Travelers Companies Inc.TRV9.94
CF Industries HoldingsCF9.94
Lincoln National Corp.LNC10.04
Ford Motor Co.F10.23
Hess Corp.HES10.36
International Business Machines Corp.IBM10.39
Verizon Communications Inc.VZ10.48
Lyondellbasell IndustriesLYB10.52
Masco Corp.MAS10.55
Murphy Oil Corp.MUR10.69
Chevron Corp.CVX10.72
AT&T Inc.T10.88
Capital One Financial Corp.COF10.91
Allstate Corp.ALL10.92
Goldman Sachs GroupGS10.95
Figure 4: S&P 500 lowest PE stocks. Source: The Online Investor.

Digging into such a list can give you companies that have stable businesses and low valuations despite any market whim.

High Valuation Example

Not taking anything away from Facebook (FB) or giving any investment analysis, we are going to use it as an example of how a high PE ratio stock can influence our long term investment.

FB’s current weight in the S&P 500 is 1.53% which means that the average Joe that only invests in the S&P 500 has 1.53% of his portfolio in FB. This might be a good thing as FB has had an extraordinary performance since its IPO, but it also means you are paying $125 a share for something that has a book value of $17.54 and EPS of $2.09.

FB will probably continue on its growth path in the future, but investors must understand such a situation carries more risk and the risk can be explained with the huge fall other social networking stocks have witnessed.

figure 5 FB LNKD
Figure 5: Facebook’s, Twitter’s and LinkedIn’s performances in the last 4 years. Source: Yahoo Finance.

LinkedIn has fallen from a price of above $250 per share at the end of 2015 to a price near $100 earlier this year due to lower growth. It was saved by Microsoft which bought it for $26.2 billion, or $196 per share.

Twitter didn’t find any suitors, so its price is still 55% below IPO.

Any change in FB’s growth trajectory, which is bound to arrive sometime as no corporation can grow forever, can have a LinkedIn effect on Facebook which will mean that half of the 1.53% of one’s portfolio would be wiped out.

Another example of high PE ratios and low returns could be Microsoft which bought LinkedIn despite the company not being profitable. Microsoft’s PE ratio is currently around 28 which puts it into the higher valuation quartiles. Microsoft’s weight in the S&P 500 is 2.41%.

Conclusion

The main message of this article is that you can choose where to be invested and you can minimize long term risk and, from an historical perspective, you do not even have to sacrifice your returns. By buying the stocks that are suitable to your investing goals you can achieve better returns and avoid the market risks you don’t like. Those can be social networking stocks, money-losing car makers, or oil companies. Because in order to have a well-diversified portfolio, you only need about 20 stocks.

figure 6 portfolio risk
Figure 6: Number of stocks needed in order to eliminate market risks. Source: Investopedia.

As index funds are created for long-term investors that want to be well diversified, if you want something other than that, you can lower your risk and achieve better returns by buying stocks that have higher earnings as in the long term, stock returns and earnings are perfectly correlated.

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